Oportunity found the remains of drinking water on Mars

86930x 01. 07. 2013 1 Reader

The NASA Oportunity vehicle has made Mars an amazing discovery: it has proven that there was drinking water in the past on the red planet. According to the latest discoveries that have been carried out by the long 9 flight, the water on Mars was probably sour.

From the 2011 solar panels, the six-wheeled Oportunity powered vehicle explored the Endeavor crater. This is the largest of the five craters that have already explored the vehicle.

In the Endeavor crater, the vehicle found minerals, dating back to the first billion years of Martian geological history. When the carriage scrambled after a few attempts on the highest floors of light-colored rocks. Here he found traces of clay materials containing aluminum. It can be assumed that they were created by interacting with pH-neutral water.

Other stones that Oportunity has been testing for many years have confirmed that the water was certainly present on Mars. Scientists, however, assume that it was sour and unsuitable for a sustainable life.

The rock's high sulfur content and softness are probably evidence of past alteration by water. Image Credit: NASA / JPL / Cornell

"That's the water you can drink," said Steve Squyares, head of the Oportunity mission.

In 2004, twin-wheelchairs Oportunity and Spirit landed each on the opposite half-poles of the Red Planet. It was assumed that they would operate in the order of three months. In fact, they have endured for many years.

Spirit worked until 2010 when he was stuck in the sand and then stopped communicating with mission control. Oportunity continues to collect valuable information as it moves along Mars. Although its hardware ages, it is a valuable experience. The latest flash memory problem, but fortunately, we managed to restart the system.

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity uses its panoramic camera (Pancam) to acquire this view of Solander Point during the 3,325th Martian Day or Sol mission (June 1, 2013). Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / Cornell Univ. / Arizona State Univ.

Curiosity, NASA's third and latest NASA carrier on Mars, landed on Red Planet 5. August 2012. He is also active and is preparing for a key mission in the Martian Mountains. Earlier this year, the Curiosity confirmed that drinking water had once existed on Mars.

In 2010, a group of scientists at Colorado University published an article in the Nature Geoscience magazine stating that three billion billions of years ago roughly one third of the surface was covered with water. These conclusions were based on data obtained from NASA trucks and ESA orbital satellites. Geologists believe that Mars had rivers, lakes and the ocean.

The ocean covered approximately 36% of the surface of the Red Planet, which ultimately meant 124 million miles of cubic water. This represents the 1 / 10 volume of water on the Earth's surface (which has 1386 million cubic kilometers). This corresponds to the fact that Mars is about half the size of our planet Earth.

An artist's concept portrays and the NASA Mars Exploration Rover on the surface of Mars. Image credit: NASA / JPL / Cornell University

Source: rt.com

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8 comments on "Oportunity found the remains of drinking water on Mars"

  • MarHor MarHor says:

    She would not fly there.

    • Sueneé says:

      Certainly? Even though there will be a less dense atmosphere, I think it's a question of the size of the rotor blades to get the necessary buoyancy.

      • S. S. says:

        The diameter of the rotors would have to be roughly 5x larger, but the weight of the whole device could not be changed.
        It would also be necessary to solve the charging and resistance (frost-resistance) of the used cells.

        • Sueneé says:

          Curiosity uses a nuclear reactor, is not it? Either directly to the quadrocopter, but it would affect the weight and / or have a base that will accumulate the energy to recharge. Disadvantage - must come back.

          • S. S. says:

            The source in Curiosity gives roughly 110 W at its own weight 45 kg. That would not be enough for the flying apparatus on Earth, let alone Mars.
            The bumper is better because it does not have to resist the buoyancy. Additionally, the vehicle is likely to be farther away from the landing gear than a fixed base.

  • Vašek says:

    Why the next quadrocopter will not be there? Could she explore far larger areas?

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